The Indian Army plans to use micro audio bugs, video devices, other micro devices and new age gadgets to keep a watch on terrorist hideouts, meeting places and activities. Says Army on the possible uses of nanotechnology products in the ˜Technology Perspective and Capability Roadmap for the Defence Ministry.
It contemplates to use nanotechnology applications to develop nano security devices. Being a future manufacturing technology, nano tech will make most products lighter, stronger, cleaner, less expensive and smaller in size. This and many interesting uses and possibilities of nano products in future are featured in the first anniversary issue of ˜Nano Digest’, India’s first magazine on Nanotechnology published from Hyderabad city. The magazine is just hit the market.
Another interesting piece of news is about the development of world’s most powerful microscope, which is now up and running at the University of Texas at San Antonio in USA. The JEOL transmission electron microscope, model JEM-ARM200F, will propel the development of new cancer therapies and disease treatments by allowing nanotechnology researchers to see samples magnified 20 million times its original size. This is certainly a remarkable progress.
This new and the most powerful microscope can herald new chapter in cancer treatment to pinpoint and burn away the damaged cells without harming the surrounding healthy cells. It will also be used to study Alzheimer’s disease to develop new materials and for other applications.
What is Nanotech? It is not known well so far in India though mention of it was made in 1959. It is the study of controlling of matter on an atomic and molecular scale. One nanometer (nm) is one billionth, or 10 to the power of minus 9 of the meter. To put it more simply, a centimeter is one-hundredth of a meter, a millimeter is one-thousandth of a meter, and a micrometer is one-millionth of a meter, but all of these are still huge compared to the nanoscale. A nanometer (nm) is one-billionth of a meter, smaller than the wavelength of visible light and a hundred-thousandth the width of a human hair. Nanotechnology is a technology with future full of promises.
The first anniversary issue features a cover story on the need for patenting of scientific discoveries is just hit the market. In an exclusive article, it presented the need and urgency to safeguard India’s scientific findings in this world of piracy and cheating. The cover article presents the guidelines and thorough information about the need for patenting of scientific discoveries. Among other features, the issue also has an exclusive article written by Prof. R. Tenne of Israel. A thought provoking article on the way from lab to market is presented for Indian scientists to get inspired. The issue also delves in Nanocomputing, Analytical & Measuring Instruments for Nanotechnology, Nanotech Courses, Nano Lab Alerts, Nanomedicine Updates and others. All in all, an issue worth preserving.
The annual issue also discusses about many advancements in nanoscience. One such an eye opener is how highly lethal venom of cone snail helps in medicine. The highly lethal venom contained in cone snails found in coastal waters near coral reefs when extracted and administered via nanotechnologic methods can potentially be used as a safe and effective alternative to highly addictive morphine based medications.
The only of its kind of magazine in India on Nanotechnology was launched last June. Nano Messiah, world’s great scientist and Father of Indian Nanotechnology Prof. C.N.R. Rao launched it then. One year down the lane, Nano Digest emerged as premier magazine with well over 8000 readership.
Who says ˜No-no to Nano�. The encouraging support magazine receiving from month to month over the last one year proves that Nano is happening in India. Many who felt that market was not ripe for such a magazine proved otherwise, said K.Jayadev, Editor of Nano Digest English monthly. It also dispelled the myth that journalists do not understand technology. Hence, they shouldn’t publish a technology magazine was the opinion of the industry. But, Nano Digest proved that journalists too can edit and produce technology magazine, informed Jayadev.
We wanted to develop a popular magazine, which would decipher technology, inform and educate people about this lesser known science. Nano Digest has been popularizing nanoscience and technology over the past one year. Today Nano Digest has become a platform for many to talk about their experiments and findings; about new products and discoveries; about their curriculum, conferences. Today Nano Digest is the one-stop source for information on Nano Science in India, declared Mr. K. Hari Prasad, Publisher of Nano Digest.
In a short time Nano Digest forged partnerships with many International organisations and particiapated in Conferences like Nanotech India in Kochi, ICE in New Delhi, Indo-US workshop in Hyderabad, ICONSAT in Mumbai, ICONN in Chennai and many others. Among its subscribers are IITs, IIScs, JNCASR (Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research), most of Universities, CSIR Institute, Engineering Colleges, etc. across the country.
Many Industry Stalwarts, who’s-who of Nanotechnology in India and abroad, Nano Scientists, Nano Industry captains contribute articles regularly.